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Carey, Fuller, et al.

The Baptists of some kind had existed as the Baptist Church for 1784 years before "the first Baptist movement in foreign missions was made." If the Baptists must engage in the modern mission work to be Scriptural, or the church Jesus built, then it follows that the Baptists were not Scriptural, not the church Jesus built, for the space of 1784 years. The modern Missionary Baptists can go back one hundred and fifty years, and there they find themselves confronted with a Baptist family that held to what they call Hyper-Calvinism had no Sunday schools, mission boards, conventions, mite societies, nor any of the cumbrous load of mission machinery that has made its entrance into their ranks on the Missionary train that first left Rome. "It is, however, a very remarkable circumstance, that in modern missions Papal Rome has led the way."--Minutes of Philadelphia Association, p. 429. Mosheim informs us that "when the Roman Pontiffs saw their ambition checked by the progress of the Reformation. which deprived them of a great part of spiritual dominion in Europe. they turned their lordly views toward the other parts of the globe." There was a society formed in 1540 which took the denomination of Jesuits, or the "Company of Jesus," and were by the Pope chiefly employed, at first in India, Japan and China, after which they spared no pains in propagating their erroneous sentiments in the West Indies and on the continent of America. Just two hundred and fifty-two years after the Jesuits organized their society to propagate their erroneous sentiments in the different sections of the world for the purpose of saving sinners, Carey, Fuller, Sutcliff and others organized a society in a back hall of the residence of Mrs. Beebe Wallis October 2, 1792, at which time they saw king Hyper-Calvinism die, and in their estimation they saw the Roman Catholic train just in from Rome high and lifted up, and they boarded it. They had not been riding on this train long until they began to upbraid those who refused to contribute to the upkeep of this fast train with ignorance and having no concern whatever in the salvation of sinners.

Mr. Fuller removed to Kettering in 1782. at which time the church there believed the doctrine he called Hyper-Calvinism. It is said he became an eloquent, original and successful preacher, while in theology be was one of the lights and leaders of the world. He loved to see the churches shake off the shackles of Hyper-Calvinism, for he said, in his strong language, that "had matters gone on but a few years the Baptists would have become a perfect dunghill in society."--Armitage. p. 584. The church at Kettering were Hyper-Calvinistic in belief and the Missionary Baptists say they were like the Primitive Baptists of the United States. I will let Elder William Gadsby, of England, tell us what the Fullerites called and still call Hyper-Calvinism:

"This is the last will and testament of me, William Gadsby, of the township of Chatham, in the parish of Manchester, in the county of Lancaster, Baptist minister of the everlasting gospel of God our Saviour, by the matchless grace of God, through the invincible power of God the Holy Ghost, made and published as follows; that is to say, First, I am brought firmly to believe and maintain that the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are the Word of God, and the only certain rule of faith and practice. And I also further observe that I firmly believe in three equal Persons, namely, God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Ghost, in one glorious undivided Jehovah; and that each glorious Person is an object of Spiritual worship, and is loved, praised, arid adored as such by all the heaven-born family of God; and that a denial of this glorious truth is altogether Anti-Christian, and repugnant to the glory of God. I also believe in the glorious doctrine of absolute, personal, and unconditional election; and that God's dear elect were chosen in Christ before the foundation of the world, both to grace and glory. I believe in special, definite, and particular redemption, by the glorious Person of Immanuel; and that the doctrine of an indefinite atonement is, to say the least of it, an invention of men. calculated to vamp up a whole-hearted sinner, and distress those whose hearts the Lord has broken. I believe in effectual grace in calling: and that God the Holy Ghost both has made and will make all the elect willing in the day of God's power. I believe that all the sins of the elect are absolutely pardoned through the glorious atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ; and that their persons are justified in His glorious righteousness, without an idea as to their works, worth, or worthiness, as the cause, in any sense whatever, of their justification before God. but absolutely in and by the righteousness of Christ imputed to them. and that they stand complete in Christ. I believe in the eternal and inseparable union of the elect to the Lord Jesus Christ, as the glorious Head of the church. I believe that all spiritual blessings are treasured up in Christ. and that all grace and glory, necessary for the holiness and happiness of God's elect, are secure) in Christ for them, and made sure to them. I believe that nothing short of the divine quickening power and special teachings of God the Holy Ghost can make a sinner spiritually acquainted with the glorious truths of God's grace: and that all religion short of that which God the Spirit teacheth and leadeth into by His glorious, quickening, enlightening, leaching, guiding, anointing, and sealing power, is at best but a fair show in the flesh: and every elect sinner must have his fleshly religion rooted up by the roots, to be fuel for the fire, in the day when God purgeth His people 'by the spirit of burning' (Isaiah iv. 4); for every real believer in Christ must and shall in this world have his works tried by fire (1 Corinthians iii. 13). I believe that the kingdom of God is a spiritual kingdom in all its bearings; and that God the Spirit sets up and maintains the kingdom of grace in the hearts of all His people, and by His invincible power enables them to give God the whole of the glory. And I believe that all religion short of a spiritual religion, taught and maintained by the Spirit of God, will leave its possessor to perish in his sins. I believe that while God's quickened children remain in this vale of tears there will be a constant warfare between flesh and spirit, the old man and the new, but that "grace shall reign through righteousness unto eternal life."--Life of Gadsby, p. 139.

In this lengthy quotation we have the doctrine expressed that the Baptists believed before Carey and Fuller came among them, and they still believe it. The Missionary Baptists do not believe it. Therefore, they are the fallen away party and not the original kind of Baptists in doctrine and practice.

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The Primitive or Old School Baptists cling to the doctrines and practices held by Baptist Churches throughout America at the close of the Revolutionary War. This site is dedicated to providing access to our rich heritage, with both historic and contemporary writings.