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New Hope Primitive Baptist Church

 

Fort Worth, Texas

The New Hope Primitive Baptist Church is located in east Fort Worth, just off of Interstate 30 and Loop 820.  The address of the Church is 7200 Kuban Street, Fort Worth, Texas 76113.

 

 

The history of the New Hope Primitive Baptist Church can be traced back to the late 1950’s, when those who would later form the New Hope Church were actually members at the Paradise Primitive Baptist Church in Arlington, Texas.  The Paradise Primitive Baptist Church was constituted in 1956 and their pastor at the time was Elder Robert A. “Bob” Moore.

 

For various reasons, Elder Moore and several members of the Paradise Primitive Baptist Church left the Church in 1963 to begin meeting on their own.  Elder Hylton Crain was then called as pastor at Paradise PBC that same year and would serve the Church for many more years.

 

The group that left (still calling themselves “Paradise Primitive Baptist Church”), began using the building facilities of the Little Vine Primitive Baptist Church to meet in.  This location was just off Highway 287 in south Fort Worth around the Kennedale area.  Due to doctrinal differences, the two groups of people didn’t worship together – but instead those who left Arlington would merely use the building on the two Sunday’s a month that the Little Vine congregation did not meet.

 

Over the next few years, the Little Vine Primitive Baptist Church would move to a location on Kuban Street in Fort Worth.  Also, the Little Vine Church did not have a pastor during this time, so many of their members would come on the off Sunday’s to hear Eld. Moore preach.  In time, the two bodies would merge.  All of those coming from the Little Vine Church were re-baptized.

 

Around this same time and during a conference in 1966 - the Church voted unanimously to change their name to the “New Hope Primitive Baptist Church”.  For many years after that, the New Hope Church did not fellowship with many of the area Churches.  This began to change in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s.  Eld. Moore remained pastor until his death in March of 1991 and the New Hope Church called Eld. George Walker as pastor the following month.

 

Elder George Walker still serves the Church as pastor to this very day.  ( )

 

 

Pictured:  Elder George & Sister Eleanor Walker

 

 

The New Hope Primitive Baptist Church hosts services every Sunday.  Song service begins at 10:30am and preaching services at 11:00am.  The preaching appointments are as follows:

 

1st – Elder George Walker

2nd – Elder George Walker

3rd – Elder Shane Nix

4th – Elder George Walker

5th – Elder George Walker

 

Each first weekend in October the New Hope Church hosts and annual meeting.  This October, the annual meeting will be a “singing” on Saturday morning and afternoon.

 

Brother Alan Bump serves the New Hope Church as deacon.  His contact information is .

 

Sister Cheryl Bump serves the New Hope Church as Clerk.  Her contact information is

 

 

Pictured:  Brother Alan and Sister Cheryl Bump, along with their daughter.

 

 

 

Pictured:  This was taken the day of Brother Alan Bump’s ordination to the office of deacon.  In center frame from right to left - Eld. David Whattenbarger, Eld. Clifford Gowens, Eld. Dan Newman and Eld. Ed Kirkpatrick.

 

 

 

Pictured:  Eric Mallow & Bro. Tony Walker during a recent meeting at Dallas.

 

 

Traveling Directions:  Exit I-30 on Cooks Lane and turn north.  Turn left on John White Road and continue on to Williams Road.  Turn right on Williams Road and the Church is at the corner of Kuban and Williams.

 

 

 

Large Scale Map:

 

 

Close Up Map:

 

 

 

 

Note:  I want to thank Elder George Walker, Sister Cheryl Bump and Elder G.H. Crain for their help in putting together this “Our Churches” information.

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The Primitive or Old School Baptists cling to the doctrines and practices held by Baptist Churches throughout America at the close of the Revolutionary War. This site is dedicated to providing access to our rich heritage, with both historic and contemporary writings.